Britney Inventions

Britney Spears is one of our generation's greatest minds! Some of her inventions include gay rights, frappuccinos, and anime. Follow BritneyInventions to stay up-to-date on Britney's Inventionography!
Britney Spears invented body modification in 2000 when she pierced her belly button. Britney’s new adornment was considered wildly alternative but found an audience with women’s right groups. For them, Spears’ body modification represented agency over one’s own body and became a symbol of female empowerment. She later pierced her ears and cultivated tattooing.

Britney Spears invented body modification in 2000 when she pierced her belly button. Britney’s new adornment was considered wildly alternative but found an audience with women’s right groups. For them, Spears’ body modification represented agency over one’s own body and became a symbol of female empowerment. She later pierced her ears and cultivated tattooing.

Anonymous asked: I can see where you are coming from, but I can tell you that after being called a "faggot" while being beat up as a teenager for being different and trying to express myself, I really dislike that word. Too many bad memories. But you are entitled to your opinion, I was just expressing mine. Much love to you.

That’s fair and I completely understand where you’re coming from. That’s why I think it is incredibly important to assess your audience before using “faggot” in this way. Some people have really bad associations with the word and you gotta be considerate of that. I am fortunate to have never been physically assaulted for being gay, so I am not personally bothered.

Thanks for sharing your take on the issue :) I love getting feedback, especially when someone disagrees but is respectful like you were <3

Love and light,

Britney Inventions

Anonymous asked: do you think lesbians have the right to call gay men faggots? (with positive reaffirmations, ofc)

If the delivery is right and the audience shares this sensibility, that’s all that matters. As far as I’m concerned, anyone can use “faggot” to mock homophobia as long as they’re using discernment.

Anonymous asked: go to the hood and say that word and see how empowered you feel

I totally would though…I don’t see the point you’re trying to make. Are you making some kind of generalization about working-class people? Because that’s pretty shitty.

britneyinventions:

Personally, I love the word &#8220;faggot&#8221; when it&#8217;s used to uplift gay people and/or to mock the notion of homophobia (ie: &#8220;Your jokes are on-point right now, faggot&#8221;). If you use &#8220;faggot&#8221; to compliment someone, you are re-contextualizing the word to form positive associations with queerness instead of reinforcing negative ones. This is important because heterosexuals, for the most part, regulate and create meaning/connotation in ways that prioritize their dominance/ideals and they&#8217;ve shaped a connotation for &#8220;faggot&#8221; that polices queer behavior and shames people into conforming to heteronormativity. But when we, as gay people, use &#8220;faggot&#8221; as a compliment and/or to mock its use as a sincere insult, we reject the authority of that bigoted connotation and take upon ourselves the task of creating meaning in our own terms. Disempowering &#8220;faggot&#8221; (as an insult) dismantles a structure that keeps gay people subordinate to heterosexuals. When I re-contextualize &#8220;faggot&#8221;, I&#8217;m letting it be known, &#8220;Not only is it okay if you are not heteronormative, it is something to celebrate/take pride in. If you&#8217;re a big swishy homo, then that&#8217;s great. You go, girl. If you&#8217;re homophobic, I can&#8217;t honestly take you seriously. Are you 13?&#8221; 
And, for me, it isn&#8217;t sufficient to just quit using the word &#8220;faggot&#8221;; simply removing it from my vocabulary feels like I&#8217;m conceding the task of shaping meaning to bigots. It surrenders power to them. We, as gay people, should never surrender to a definition in someone else&#8217;s terms. We must hi-jack &#8220;faggot&#8221; and assert that our values and behaviors are valid. We must strip the word of its subjugating power and deny heterosexual authority over us. Next time you see your gay buddy looking on-point, yell out &#8220;Yass! Lookin&#8217; good, faggot!&#8221; (However, be smart. Hopefully you&#8217;re socially aware enough to know when this is appropriate. And some people have traumatic associations with this word so be considerate and tread lightly. I would not recommend using &#8220;faggot&#8221; with non-friends until this catches on.)
Note: Yes, I&#8217;m gay.

I have a very irreverent sense of humor so this works for me. I can understand if it&#8217;s not your thing. I just like to mock the absurdity that homophobia even exists. I imagine anyone who uses &#8220;faggot&#8221; to insult others as being stuck in 7th grade and it&#8217;s really more embarrassing for them than it is insulting to me.

britneyinventions:

Personally, I love the word “faggot” when it’s used to uplift gay people and/or to mock the notion of homophobia (ie: “Your jokes are on-point right now, faggot”). If you use “faggot” to compliment someone, you are re-contextualizing the word to form positive associations with queerness instead of reinforcing negative ones. This is important because heterosexuals, for the most part, regulate and create meaning/connotation in ways that prioritize their dominance/ideals and they’ve shaped a connotation for “faggot” that polices queer behavior and shames people into conforming to heteronormativity. But when we, as gay people, use “faggot” as a compliment and/or to mock its use as a sincere insult, we reject the authority of that bigoted connotation and take upon ourselves the task of creating meaning in our own terms. Disempowering “faggot” (as an insult) dismantles a structure that keeps gay people subordinate to heterosexuals. When I re-contextualize “faggot”, I’m letting it be known, “Not only is it okay if you are not heteronormative, it is something to celebrate/take pride in. If you’re a big swishy homo, then that’s great. You go, girl. If you’re homophobic, I can’t honestly take you seriously. Are you 13?” 

And, for me, it isn’t sufficient to just quit using the word “faggot”; simply removing it from my vocabulary feels like I’m conceding the task of shaping meaning to bigots. It surrenders power to them. We, as gay people, should never surrender to a definition in someone else’s terms. We must hi-jack “faggot” and assert that our values and behaviors are valid. We must strip the word of its subjugating power and deny heterosexual authority over us. Next time you see your gay buddy looking on-point, yell out “Yass! Lookin’ good, faggot!” (However, be smart. Hopefully you’re socially aware enough to know when this is appropriate. And some people have traumatic associations with this word so be considerate and tread lightly. I would not recommend using “faggot” with non-friends until this catches on.)

Note: Yes, I’m gay.

I have a very irreverent sense of humor so this works for me. I can understand if it’s not your thing. I just like to mock the absurdity that homophobia even exists. I imagine anyone who uses “faggot” to insult others as being stuck in 7th grade and it’s really more embarrassing for them than it is insulting to me.

Personally, I love the word &#8220;faggot&#8221; when it&#8217;s used to uplift gay people and/or to mock the notion of homophobia (ie: &#8220;Your jokes are on-point right now, faggot&#8221;). If you use &#8220;faggot&#8221; to compliment someone, you are re-contextualizing the word to form positive associations with queerness instead of reinforcing negative ones. This is important because heterosexuals, for the most part, regulate and create meaning/connotation in ways that prioritize their dominance/ideals and they&#8217;ve shaped a connotation for &#8220;faggot&#8221; that polices queer behavior and shames people into conforming to heteronormativity. But when we, as gay people, use &#8220;faggot&#8221; as a compliment and/or to mock its use as a sincere insult, we reject the authority of that bigoted connotation and take upon ourselves the task of creating meaning in our own terms. Disempowering &#8220;faggot&#8221; (as an insult) dismantles a structure that keeps gay people subordinate to heterosexuals. When I re-contextualize &#8220;faggot&#8221;, I&#8217;m letting it be known, &#8220;Not only is it okay if you are not heteronormative, it is something to celebrate/take pride in. If you&#8217;re a big swishy homo, then that&#8217;s great. You go, girl. If you&#8217;re homophobic, I can&#8217;t honestly take you seriously. Are you 13?&#8221; 
And, for me, it isn&#8217;t sufficient to just quit using the word &#8220;faggot&#8221;; simply removing it from my vocabulary feels like I&#8217;m conceding the task of shaping meaning to bigots. It surrenders power to them. We, as gay people, should never surrender to a definition in someone else&#8217;s terms. We must hi-jack &#8220;faggot&#8221; and assert that our values and behaviors are valid. We must strip the word of its subjugating power and deny heterosexual authority over us. Next time you see your gay buddy looking on-point, yell out &#8220;Yass! Lookin&#8217; good, faggot!&#8221; (However, be smart. Hopefully you&#8217;re socially aware enough to know when this is appropriate. And some people have traumatic associations with this word so be considerate and tread lightly. I would not recommend using &#8220;faggot&#8221; with non-friends until this catches on.)
Note: Yes, I&#8217;m gay.

Personally, I love the word “faggot” when it’s used to uplift gay people and/or to mock the notion of homophobia (ie: “Your jokes are on-point right now, faggot”). If you use “faggot” to compliment someone, you are re-contextualizing the word to form positive associations with queerness instead of reinforcing negative ones. This is important because heterosexuals, for the most part, regulate and create meaning/connotation in ways that prioritize their dominance/ideals and they’ve shaped a connotation for “faggot” that polices queer behavior and shames people into conforming to heteronormativity. But when we, as gay people, use “faggot” as a compliment and/or to mock its use as a sincere insult, we reject the authority of that bigoted connotation and take upon ourselves the task of creating meaning in our own terms. Disempowering “faggot” (as an insult) dismantles a structure that keeps gay people subordinate to heterosexuals. When I re-contextualize “faggot”, I’m letting it be known, “Not only is it okay if you are not heteronormative, it is something to celebrate/take pride in. If you’re a big swishy homo, then that’s great. You go, girl. If you’re homophobic, I can’t honestly take you seriously. Are you 13?” 

And, for me, it isn’t sufficient to just quit using the word “faggot”; simply removing it from my vocabulary feels like I’m conceding the task of shaping meaning to bigots. It surrenders power to them. We, as gay people, should never surrender to a definition in someone else’s terms. We must hi-jack “faggot” and assert that our values and behaviors are valid. We must strip the word of its subjugating power and deny heterosexual authority over us. Next time you see your gay buddy looking on-point, yell out “Yass! Lookin’ good, faggot!” (However, be smart. Hopefully you’re socially aware enough to know when this is appropriate. And some people have traumatic associations with this word so be considerate and tread lightly. I would not recommend using “faggot” with non-friends until this catches on.)

Note: Yes, I’m gay.

"Hold you head high, fingers to the sky"

"Hold you head high, fingers to the sky"

britneyinventions:

Britney Spears strives for professional greatness and she is dedicated to giving her audiences the best performances possible. In order to make sure she was at the top of her game, Spears invented the concept of rehearsals (1999). Thanks to rehearsals, Spears consistently delivers quality performances on stage and in the studio. Rehearsing material made Spears much more successful than her fellow performers and it was quickly adopted as an industry standard.

britneyinventions:

Britney Spears strives for professional greatness and she is dedicated to giving her audiences the best performances possible. In order to make sure she was at the top of her game, Spears invented the concept of rehearsals (1999). Thanks to rehearsals, Spears consistently delivers quality performances on stage and in the studio. Rehearsing material made Spears much more successful than her fellow performers and it was quickly adopted as an industry standard.